Yr2 spelling in the new curriculum

Some of you might have guessed that Becca and I are still working.  We will stop on Friday but here is tonight’s offering.  Spelling in Yr2.

With the new curriculum we have come to realise that phase 6 (in Letters and Sounds) is probably no longer relevant. Our current advice is that Yr1 pupils need to secure phase 5 and then Yr2 need to start a spelling programme.  And so with that in mind we have written a session by session plan.  It starts off with daily spelling and moves in the summer term to spelling 5 times over a fortnight to come in to line with Yr3 and KS2. However, if your cohort is not great at spelling you might need to continue daily spelling all year and Yr3 might need to start with daily spelling in the first term and then reduce the amount.

We have updated the spelling pathway to include Yr2

You will find the overview and what to teach each session available here.

The Fishing Trip by Beatrice Rodriguez

The Fishing Trip by Rodriguez  is a wonderful wordless book that I will be adding to the list of wordless books on our texts that teach list.  Thanks @madaboutbooks for the recommendation.

The book tells the story of Fox, Chicken and Crab who open the fridge to find the cupboard bare.  Chicken and Crab then go off on a fishing trip to catch some food.  They catch a large fish, only for a cross eagle-type bird to catch hold of the fish and drag Chicken and Crab off.  They end up entangled with a nasty-looking sea-snake and escape back home.  There a big surprise awaits them and I laughed out loud when I turned to the last page and saw what they were having for tea.

The book would work particularly well with units of literacy in Yrs2 – 4 where a traditional tale is being looked at, as the story lends itself to that type of story telling.  It would fit into the capturing ideas part of a teaching sequence providing a structure for children to retell their own story.  We are in discussion about the blueprint – voyage and return or quest. It fits both and the one you would choose would be dependent upon how strongly you felt the desire was to go on a journey to solve the problem of no food .

I was delighted to see that there were  more books in the series: The Chicken Thief, Fox and Hen TogetherRooster’s Revenge  and The Treasure Thief due out at the end of this month. I am going to have to start collecting them!

Have you come across any good books recently?

WANTED: The Perfect Pet by Fiona Roberton

Followers of this blog will know only to well my penchant for a good book to use to support literacy teaching.  Well thanks to @bogchild we have a new one suitable for Yr2.

This is the story of Henry and what he wanted more than anything else in the whole wide world.  A perfect pet, of course,  in the form of a dog.

There is however a duck who wants, more than anything else in the world,  a friend.  With a little bit of disguise by the duck, the two get together and have great fun until the disguise falls off.

The book is told in three short chapters which is unusual for a picture book.  The first chapter tells about Henry and the second chapter about the duck.  The third chapter tells  what happens when they get together.  There are opportunities for creating wanted posters, adverts, labelled diagrams and non-chronological reports.  It makes a wonderful text for children to innovate upon, writing about their own perfect pet.

The second sentence in the book is wonderful and is one that is definitely worth learning and remembering and using for children to create their own version.

What Henry wanted more than anything else in the whole wide world, more than chips, more than a cowboy costume, more than an all expenses paid trip to the moon, more, even, than world peace itself, was a dog.

The blueprint of this book is rags to riches.

What is your favourite text that teaches at the moment?

The Beasties – a great talk for writing book

Happy New Year to you all.  2011 looks like being every bit as exciting as 2010 did.  I thought I would start off the year as I mean to go on and  therefore want to share a great new book with you.

beastiesThe Beasties by Jenny Nimmo and Gwen Millard is a fantastic book that can be used in a couple of different ways but both related to talk for writing.

The book follows in the long tradition of children’s literature about night time and not being able to get to sleep and the worries that the dark can bring.  Daisy is a little girl that finds it difficult to get to sleep, lying awake listening to all the sounds of the street and not noticing the three creatures, could they be monsters, that creep into her room and start to look at all their treasures.  What these three creatures do is pick out one of their treasures and tell a story around it just like storytellers do.  When Daisy finally plucks up the courage to look under her bed, where they are hiding, she finds three very very small beasties and is encouraged to make up her own stories.

This book would make a great model for children to create their own version of in groups with each child writing their own story based around an object.  What you will need for this is a story telling bag with lots of objects in it such as rings, unicorns, special keys, bowls etc that a story can be built around.

The book could also be used however to develop children’s  ability to add detail because each of the stories is in reality a bare bones.  This would mean that the children could learn the bare bones and then using games such as ‘Tell me more about…’ they could add  detail and description to each section and then tell their version of the story.  They would provide a good opportunity to consider how the reader is to feel during each section and how that can be achieved.

This book is suitable for Yr2 or 3 pupils and will be added to our texts that teach fiction list.

What new texts will you use this year in your literacy teaching?